Worthwhile
Blog Podcasts The Dialogue Magazine About Us
BLOG SEARCH
ONLINE
MAGAZINE
Subscribe
GENERAL
FAQ
WORTHWHILE FOUNDERS

Sign up for Worthwhile's free weekly e-zine.


 
Home > Blog > Losing it? Move it.
Out of Our Minds
Thursday, April 15, 2004 10:29 AM
Losing it? Move it.
Kate Yandoh on Passionate Work

Halley's coverage of The Apprentice has led me take a new look at The Donald. Peering behind the comb-over, I found this Trump prescription for vocational discontent.

'Let's say I'm a coal miner. Now, that's a tough job: you go into the mines, you don't get that much money, you work all day long, and after 20 years you catch black lung disease. If I were a coal miner and if I didn't like it, I'd pick up a newspaper and say, 'What area of the country is doing great? Is it Seattle? Is it New York City?' I'd get my ass moving to that area and I'd get a job that I like better.'

Americans have a historical tradition of hitching up the wagons (station or covered) to find better work. Now that we have technology that can help loosen geographic bonds, is it time for more of us to consider hitting the road?


12 comments

Bovine Growth Hormone - 2/24/2005 2:39:45 PM
http://www.hghadvisor.com/hgh_shop.html Bovine Growth Hormone
Human Growth Hormone - 2/24/2005 2:18:54 PM
Human Growth Hormone HGH Hormone HGH Enhancer http://www.hghadvisor.com/
Rennie - 4/18/2004 6:01:33 PM
There are a lot of good points on these posts. I have several friends 'trapped' in a city because they are divorced with children they don't want to leave, and they are faced with dwindling job prospects.

I think the Trump prescription for geographic locale also applies to industry. If your industry becomes obsolete, or you're peddling a product proven to be dangerous, it's probably time to regroup.

Then there's the preference of working virtually vs. the office. I've gone through both phases, I need people and interaction, I've found, but maybe ideally there would be a balance.

I remember a colleague in my New York office who used to 'sneak out' at six, leaving an extra coat on her chair, computer on, filled styrofoam coffee cup on her desk, to jump on the train to go be with her kids. That was a competitive environment, though, with some employees loudly promoting their latest greatest ideas in the hallway outside the CEO's office whenever possible.

Some jobs require in-person interaction, and ugh...meetings!, but the occasional virtual workday shouldn't be the end of the world.

The Europe gig sounds terrific. I'm guessing that's a not a competitive corporate situation with ambitious twenty or thirty-somethings in the office vying for the job done by someone at home?
Rennie - 4/18/2004 6:00:20 PM
There are a lot of good points on these posts. I have several friends 'trapped' in a city because they are divorced with children they don't want to leave, and they are faced with dwindling job prospects.

I think the Trump prescription for geographic locale also applies to industry. If your industry becomes obsolete, or you're peddling a product proven to be dangerous, it's probably time to regroup.

Then there's the preference of working virtually vs. the office. I've gone through both phases, I need people and interaction, I've found, but maybe ideally there would be a balance.

I remember a colleague in my New York office who used to 'sneak out' at six, leaving an extra coat on her chair, computer on, filled styrofoam coffee cup on her desk, to jump on the train to go be with her kids. That was a competitive environment, though, with some employees loudly promoting their latest greatest ideas in the hallway outside the CEO's office whenever possible.

Some jobs require in-person interaction, and ugh...meetings!, but the occasional virtual workday shouldn't be the end of the world.

The Europe gig sounds terrific. I'm guessing that's a not a competitive corporate situation with ambitious twenty or thirty-somethings in the office vying for the job done by someone at home?
Elizabeth Albrycht - 4/16/2004 4:54:44 AM
I say hit the road! And don't confine yourself to the US. I work virtually from Europe much of the time. Now, working alone isn't for everyone, but it works for me! I have no commute, I can do chores as needed so my weekend isn't ruined, and when I feel like it, I can jump a train to one of the great cities of Europe. I can't imagine ever going back to the 9 to 5 (hell it was more like 8 - midnight).

Anyways, pretty soon in order to get entry-level tech experience you are going to have to move to India or SE Asia. This isn't a bad thing! People have been doing it the other direction for generations. The more the generally insular Americans get out and work in places around the globe the better.

Rambling a bit here...my enthusiasm is controlling my fingers!
Matt - 4/16/2004 1:21:18 AM
For me, the connection to place is paramount.

After spending a couple years moving between Western Canada, Washington State, & Guatemala, I'm struck by the incredible power a place has to change living patterns. The way I eat, how I socialize, what I feel when I wake up in the morning... I often feel like I'm moving between entirely different lives. Which can be good or bad, depending on the 'life' in question...

But that feeling of being alive, which I get from the right sense of place, THAT'S what I'm willing to pick up and go for.
Evelyn Rodriguez - 4/15/2004 7:19:31 PM
I just wrote in my blog today about why I moved to the SF Bay Area in late 2002. Not that Bay Area was exactly booming then -- I was taking a calculated risk.

About the alternative of working virtually...

I'm very used to working remotely -- and for someone who thrives on autonomy it has advantages -- but there is just no replacement (for me) to the vibrancy and energy of face-to-face real live interaction with intelligent, innovative, forward-looking people.

'Creative agents cluster around other creative agents, reinforcing each other's productivity. Creative agents then come together to form larger economic units or firms. These firms then locate in cities where they grow and develop. Cities in turn grow and develop as locations for creative agents and firms.' - Richard Florida, The Rise of the Creative Class
K! - 4/15/2004 6:14:53 PM
That's why Kombiant! loves Trump. The Agent of Noise he is. Good at it he is. Statements he makes infantilizes people's connections to other people and places. The solution of a parasite his suggestion is. Just move to a new tree to suck juice and then move on again. Like a Parasite. Kombiant! loves Trump.
Jenny - 4/15/2004 4:49:56 PM
I agree with Martin -- picking up and leaving is easier said than done, especially if you're a single parent with joint custody and a mortgage. Doesn't mean it can't be done at all, but it's definitely not simple or painless. You better be damn sure you find what you're seeking when you do up and go.
martin - 4/15/2004 4:30:44 PM
Virtual work is all well and good if it can be had. But there is a connection to place, both work (the actual work environment) and a person's surroundings that can't be discounted. I agree (for once) with Trump that a person should pick up and go, but more often than not that's easier said than done.
Kate - 4/15/2004 3:16:07 PM
Absolutely. I'd think a lot of jobs could be done this way (coal mining excepted.) There's an interesting overview on virtual work written city-fleeing people at:
www.goodbyecitylife.com/country-life/online-employment.htm
Kevin - 4/15/2004 10:38:23 AM
The alternative, of course, is to work virtually, using email, the Web and phones to be anywhere and everywhere. As William Gibson calls it in his very cool novel 'Pattern Recognition,' it's a 'post-geographic' world.

Name:  
Email:  
URL:
Comments:
 

Enter this
code below:
 What is this?
Code:  
Home   |   Blog   |   Blog Archive   |   Podcasts   |   The Dialogue   |   Subscribe   |   Advertise   |   Customer Service
About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Resources / Promotions   |   FAQ
Copyright © 2006 dash30, Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy. 45