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Home > Blog > Worthwhile Thought: Tuesday
Out of Our Minds
Tuesday, September 13, 2005 8:42 AM
Worthwhile Thought: Tuesday
Anita Sharpe on Passionate Work

'I like to have a break to go running or walking. I try to do that every day. When I run I'm thinking about my work and it's a form of meditation. It's serious; it's part of the work.

'I have a world-famous astrophysicist friend -- he does most of his work thinking. He could be on an airplane, he's looking out the window. Before he goes to his computer, he has everything worked out in his head. If you looked at Mozart, you would have seen a man sitting. He only had to compose 20 minutes a day because he had it all in his head. So you'd say Mozart was a person who worked for 20 minutes. That's a naive view.' -- Author Joyce Carol Oates, interviewed in the March issue of Worthwhile magazine



4 comments

Janet Auty-Carlisle - 9/15/2005 10:55:32 AM
Personally I'm a swimmer. I try to do a mile at least three times a week. When I'm in the water there is nothing that can distract me and it's amazing how much clearer things seem after I am done. In fact, when I am having a really tough time sorting through something I make sure I get out for a swim, and a hard swim at that, to make sure I've got all the energy flowing.
As a coach we talk about inquiry questions. Those are the really deep, life changing questions that take time to think about. It's important to set time aside and reflect and really consider all aspects of a situation before coming to a conclusion. It's too bad in this world of hurry up and wait that sitting and thinking is seen as a bad thing.
Living la vida fearless,
Jan
www.tobeyourbest.net
Scott Seydel - 9/14/2005 8:56:13 PM
Not just jogging, swimming, or biking but any multi-tasking activity that involves repetitive physical actions allows meditative thought. Even making beds, dropping laundry in the washer, cooking, and other routine household chores. Mozart was probably a neat-freak who hummed his way through his creations while ironing his pants.
Scott Seydel - 9/14/2005 8:54:50 PM
Not just jogging, swimming, or biking but any multi-tasking activity that involves repetitive physical actions allows meditative thought. Even making beds, dropping laundry in the washer, cooking, and other routine household chores. Mozart was probably a neat-freak who hummed his way through his creations while ironing his pants.
Laura Bergells - 9/13/2005 3:29:26 PM
...yet another reason to get rid of billable hours, and charge by the project.

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