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Home > Blog > Measuring the Wrong Stuff
Out of Our Minds
Friday, June 17, 2005 11:58 AM
Measuring the Wrong Stuff
Anita Sharpe on Business

Every quarter, the U.S. Department of Labor issues its productivity reports and, depending on whether our collective output per hour goes up or down, Wall Street rewards or punishes investors. By this measure, if Worthwhile's writers crank out six horrible stories in an hour -- as opposed to one well-thought-out piece over a week, that's a good thing.

Kevin Kelly, in his book, 10 Rules for the New Economy, got it right: 'Any job that can be measured for productivity probably should be eliminated from the list of jobs that people do. . .Where humans are most actively engaged with their imaginations, we don't see productivity gains -- and why should we? Is a Hollywood movie company that produces longer movies per dollar more productive that one that produces shorter movies?'

It's time to measure new things. Any thoughts on what they should be?


4 comments

RTodd - 6/18/2005 11:40:36 AM
Time to profit! In a world where value must be created quickly and only lasts for a very short time. That time to value or profit must be measured.
RTodd - 6/18/2005 11:40:08 AM
Time to profit! In a world where value must be created quickly and only lasts for a very short time. That time to value or profit must be measured.
Eric Sohn - 6/18/2005 6:41:37 AM
When I was in software, one actually useful measurement (needle in the haystack, to be sure) was the number of post-implementation fixes and the number of re-fixes. To the extent that it measured how well we were doing our analysis, design and testing, it was useful.
Harold Jarche - 6/17/2005 4:33:36 PM
A similar question was just asked here:
http://nineshift.typepad.com/weblog/2005/06/is_productivity.html

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